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NUCA: TOAD TAILS by Eliasome NUCA: TOAD TAILS by Eliasome
  • Scientific name = Scrophulariaceae: Nuttallanthus canadensis
  • Common name(s) = "Canada toadflax"
More info about this plant (from USDA PLANTS website): NUCA


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:iconnikki-vdp:
Nikki-vdp Featured By Owner Feb 24, 2015
Lovely delicate capture :)
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:iconeliasome:
Eliasome Featured By Owner Feb 25, 2015   Photographer
Thank you!  That one required the soft 'sweet light' of the late afternoon because the petals are interlaced with many highly-reflective whitish somethings (you can see them in the photo), and they reflect and scatter sunlight in a crazy way.  
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:iconnikki-vdp:
Nikki-vdp Featured By Owner Feb 25, 2015
I love the phrase "highly-reflective whitish somethings" :giggle:
But I know what you mean, I've had trouble with that in photographs myself as well. I'm in awe though that you know all these plant species so well. Mostly I'm like 'purple flower' ;p except when it's something rather common or when someone taught me the name before.
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:iconeliasome:
Eliasome Featured By Owner Feb 26, 2015   Photographer
HAHAHAA. Yeah, that's a highly technical phrase and so I'm glad you understand! ;) (Wink)

Thank you for your comment on my knowledge of plants.  Botany was a big part of my Ph.D coursework because my dissertation focused on a group of parasitoid (not to be confused with parasitic) wasps.  Parasitoids intentionally kill their host and only require one host to complete development from egg to adult, while parasites never intentionally kill their hosts and often utilize multiple host species or individuals to complete development.  The parasitoid wasps I studied use a specialized ovipositor to inject its egg(s) inside the larvae of other insects (mainly butterfly, moth, fly, and beetle larvae).  And many of these hosts are found feeding on or inside the plants leaves, flowerheads, stems, and branches.  And these host larvae usually feed only on certain plants.  And so a working knowledge of plants became an important part of my research.  :) (Smile) 
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:iconnikki-vdp:
Nikki-vdp Featured By Owner Feb 26, 2015
Interesting research subject, and while I did know the two subtypes existed, I actually didn't know there was a difference in term between the two them. I've actually been reading about this not too long ago but the terminology didn't feature in that article. And, well, I already had the feeling the knowledge was PhD related, it seemed pretty obvious ;)
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:iconrobertcicheckiart:
robertcicheckiart Featured By Owner Feb 22, 2015  Hobbyist General Artist
Nice photo.   *
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:iconeliasome:
Eliasome Featured By Owner Feb 22, 2015   Photographer
Thank you very much!  I'm happy you like it.
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:iconrobertcicheckiart:
robertcicheckiart Featured By Owner Feb 23, 2015  Hobbyist General Artist
No problem.   *
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:iconjohnashleigh:
JohnAshleigh Featured By Owner Feb 20, 2015   Writer
A beautiful plant, Eliasome.
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:iconeliasome:
Eliasome Featured By Owner Feb 20, 2015   Photographer
Thank you, Sir Poet! :) (Smile) 
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:iconjohnashleigh:
JohnAshleigh Featured By Owner Feb 20, 2015   Writer
Any time. ;)
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:iconthelordtaxus:
TheLordTaxus Featured By Owner Feb 20, 2015
This is a very common plant here in Louisiana. I saw a white one once.
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:iconeliasome:
Eliasome Featured By Owner Feb 20, 2015   Photographer
Yes, I've seen a few white ones mixed in with the rest also.
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:iconthelordtaxus:
TheLordTaxus Featured By Owner Feb 20, 2015
I have only seen two white ones.
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Details

Submitted on
February 20, 2015
Image Size
310 KB
Resolution
1400×1400
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Stats

Views
325
Favourites
42 (who?)
Comments
14

Camera Data

Make
NIKON
Model
E995
Shutter Speed
10/1938 second
Aperture
F/4.7
Focal Length
18 mm
ISO Speed
100
Date Taken
Nov 30, 1999, 12:00:00 AM
Software
Adobe Photoshop 7.0
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