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SI590: Look Through Me by Eliasome SI590: Look Through Me by Eliasome
This beautiful "Erman's birch" tree (Betula ermanii) frames the peak of a distant volcano between the middle of its branches.  These birch trees are commonly found growing in isolated patches on the larger islands of the archipelago.  On the central and northern islands they typically grow as a highly variable and scraggly dwarfed form, as pictured here, which I found very attractive and unique. 

More info about the volcano can be found here (from the Global Volcanism Program website): Urataman



This photo is one of a series that I took during an expedition to a large chain of volcanic islands that separate the Sea of Okhotsk from the northwestern Pacific Ocean. Please see the corresponding Gallery for detailed information on the archipelago and to see the other photos from the series. 

 
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:iconslowdog294:
slowdog294 Featured By Owner Feb 22, 2015
Intense. :winner:
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:iconeliasome:
Eliasome Featured By Owner Feb 22, 2015   Photographer
Thank you kindly, Sir Ranger! Hug  Fortunately, nearly all of these volcanic islands are uninhabited because of their remoteness and severity of winters (not to mention inadequate infrastructure in the Russian Far East) which means that these unique ecosystems will be preserved for a very long time.  I imagine, however, that there are Hobbits living in the hills who hibernate for the winter.  :D (Big Grin) 
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:iconslowdog294:
slowdog294 Featured By Owner Feb 22, 2015
This is good news on both counts, preservation and resident hobbits. They have always been kind to rangers...
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:iconeliasome:
Eliasome Featured By Owner Mar 23, 2015   Photographer
May I ask what tripod(s) you use?  I am looking to buy one and am looking for recommendations.
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:iconslowdog294:
slowdog294 Featured By Owner Mar 23, 2015
See comment above...
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:iconeliasome:
Eliasome Featured By Owner Feb 22, 2015   Photographer
:D (Big Grin) ;) (Wink) 
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:iconslowdog294:
slowdog294 Featured By Owner Mar 23, 2015
I have two heavy tripods. One is made by Manfrotto, it is an industrial strength Bogan in black. The other is made by Canon. It is silver. They each weigh over five pounds but they are very sturdy. The black Bogan holds my Nikon 35mm analogue machine. The silver Canon one holds, well, my digital Canon...
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:iconeliasome:
Eliasome Featured By Owner Mar 23, 2015   Photographer
Thank you kindly for that info!
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:iconslowdog294:
slowdog294 Featured By Owner Mar 24, 2015
You are most welcome. :nod:
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:iconjohnashleigh:
JohnAshleigh Featured By Owner Feb 21, 2015   Writer
I found the framing to be very artistic. Not only did you concentrate on the natural beauty of the tree, but you also considered the background and foreground to elevate the scene. It is great. Thanks for sharing it with us.
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:iconeliasome:
Eliasome Featured By Owner Feb 21, 2015   Photographer
Thank you very much, my friend, for your wonderfully supportive comments! :) (Smile)  It means a lot to me.
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:iconjohnashleigh:
JohnAshleigh Featured By Owner Feb 21, 2015   Writer
You are most welcome. :)
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:iconthelordtaxus:
TheLordTaxus Featured By Owner Feb 21, 2015
I like studying ancient volcanoes of the Late Cretaceous through Miocene American west. It is neat to think that the Rockies had large volcanic fields once.   
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:iconeliasome:
Eliasome Featured By Owner Feb 21, 2015   Photographer
It really is fascinating to ponder the geological time scale and to realize that all the continents were essentially a single entity called Pangea.  And it's a bit humbling to think that exactly one hundred and fifty years ago a man named Alfred Wegener proposed the idea of plate tectonics (which he called continental drift) in his 1915 book "The Origin of Continents and Oceans".  But he offered no mechanism to explain the process and so it was widely rejected.  But it sparked a scientific debate that ended fifty years later, after the accumulation of much more evidence and a plausible hypothesis, with the theory of plate tectonics in a series of publications between 1965 and 1967.

And so, we've only understood the geological / geothermal dynamics of our planet for a mere 100 years.  People live longer than that.  But the explanatory and predictive power of that theory has allowed us to finally fit most of the pieces of the puzzle(s) together.  
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:iconthelordtaxus:
TheLordTaxus Featured By Owner Feb 21, 2015
Indeed.

Have you read the book Annals Of The Former World by John McPhee?
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:iconeliasome:
Eliasome Featured By Owner Feb 21, 2015   Photographer
No, I haven't.  I just looked it up on Amazon and saw that not only is it highly rated but also is the winner of the 1999 Pulitzer Prize for Nonfiction.  I just added it to my list of book to buy.  Thanks for bringing this to my attention!!
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:iconthelordtaxus:
TheLordTaxus Featured By Owner Feb 22, 2015
I really liked it.
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February 21, 2015
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